20160208 Vision Author Culture on Knowledge Forum

Re: 20160208 Vision Author Culture on Knowledge Forum

Postby tahanson43206 » Sun Jul 01, 2018 11:38 pm

20180630 Update Knowledge Forum Knowledge Thread

As a note of possible interest to any readers who might be thinking of applying for membership in this forum:
It has been established that the Signature Line of your pending membership can be used for communication.
I do not have a way (at present) to see who has logged in recently, but I can check the status of the newest member.
If you have applied for membership in the forum, and no one else has applied after you, then you will be listed as the newest member.
It is easy for me to check the newest member status, because the newest member is listed at the bottom of the main page.
It has been established that while an applicant is waiting for approval by the administrator, I can send Private Mail to the applicant.
It has been established that an applicant who receives Private Mail can reply via the Signature Line of the membership.
This is a curious way to communicate, I admit, but I am interested in hearing from applicants.
I would like to hear from anyone who would like to try the culture of self-directed knowledge accumulation I have tried to demonstrate.

Continuing with the weekly update:

Reference #1 Page 38 Paragraph 1

Chapter: The Grace Period
Section: Water

The paragraph that begins: “However, glass and...”, cautions to be aware that some materials block ultraviolet sunlight to kill microorganisms,

I've decided to pause movement through “The Knowledge” at this point, to spend some time considering the problem of securing potable water which meets the biochemical needs of human beings, animals and plants. These entities have evolved over millennia to depend upon the solutions produced by seeping rain water through soil and rock formations, or passing rain water or snow melt through rivers and streams lined with rocks from which the moving water removes

Most drinking water prepared in 2018 (as nearly as I can tell) takes surface water as input, although a few municipal water supplies draw ground water where it is available. Water treatment follows the general pattern laid out by Dr. Dartnell, which is directed toward removing harmful substances when that can be done, and rendering harmless those which cannot be removed. My interest is in discovering how pure water can be enhanced to meet the needs of humans and other creatures which have evolved to depend upon the mixtures delivered by natural springs, in particular. As Hydrogen increasingly becomes an energy carrier of choice for advanced societies, pure water will become available in proportion to its use.

Happily, there are a number of resources available to study for guidance in preparing health giving and sustaining potable water.

This posting is for June 30th.

Here is another reference which speaks to the problem of securing potable water. In this case, I started with NASA, and found that they had contracted with a company that specializes in chemical analysis of water. The Umpqua web site includes prices for chemical analysis services of a significant variety of kinds. Apparently Umpqua developed technology for filtering water on the Space Shuttle which was an improvement over earlier technology.

NASA publication dated 05.13.04

https://www.nasa.gov/missions/science/f_water.html

http://umpquaresearch.com/

Same as: http://www.urc.cc/

Begin Quotation from Home page:
    Umpqua Research Company (URC) is a small business that offers technical services in four primary areas: [1] Drinking Water and Environmental Analysis, [2] Air and Water Purification Related Engineering Services (including NASA Flight Hardware), [3] Research & Development, and [4] Materials Testing.  Our organization was founded in 1973 by David F. Putnam and Gerald V. Colombo. William F. Michalek currently serves as President.

End Quotation.

In Reference #3, below, Mr. Bessen begins Part II, with a focus on Wages.

In pages 84-88, Mr. Bessen opens Chapter 6: “How the Weavers Got Good Wages”

Continuing on page 86, Mr. Bessen cites examples of wages lagging behind new technology by decades.

Begin Quotation:
Economic historian Robert Allen has described the first six or seven decades of British Industrial Revolution as “Engel's Pause”.
End Quotation.

During this period Mr. Bessen reports that workers gained new skills to work with new technology, but their wages did not change.

However, after decades, wages did increase in both Britain and the United States.

Begin Quotation:
Most of the increase in wages came because the weavers were paid more for their skills.
End Quotation.

In 2018 in the United States, news reports indicate that there is a demand for workers which (apparently) cannot be met by individuals who are available in the population. Interestingly (to me at least) there is a significant need for truck drivers, but that work is difficult because of the long hours away from home, and the risk of accident or negative impact upon health. Truck driving positions may be at risk over the longer term, because manufacturers of trucking systems are working hard on developing self-driving vehicles. One possible direction that truck driving positions might take is teleoperation, so that self-driving vehicles can receive assistance over the wireless Internet if they request it, or if their planned route calls for occasional human supervision. In that case, truck supervisors might have an experience similar to military drone operators, who go to work in air conditioned vans, pull a shift, and then go home for a “normal” evening off.

Next week Mr. Bessen takes up: “Wages and Alternative Employment”

(th)
Last edited by tahanson43206 on Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
May every member of The Knowledge forum grow financially, intellectually, socially and beyond.
tahanson43206
 
Posts: 492
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: 20160208 Vision Author Culture on Knowledge Forum

Postby tahanson43206 » Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:55 pm

20180707 Update Knowledge Forum Knowledge Thread

As a note of possible interest to any readers who might be thinking of applying for membership in this forum:
It has been established that the Signature Line of your pending membership can be used for communication.
I do not have a way (at present) to see who has logged in recently, but I can check the status of the newest member.
If you have applied for membership in the forum, and no one else has applied after you, then you will be listed as the newest member.
It is easy for me to check the newest member status, because the newest member is listed at the bottom of the main page.
It has been established that while an applicant is waiting for approval by the administrator, I can send Private Mail to the applicant.
It has been established that an applicant who receives Private Mail can reply via the Signature Line of the membership.
This is a curious way to communicate, I admit, but I am interested in hearing from applicants.
I would like to hear from anyone who would like to try the culture of self-directed knowledge accumulation I have tried to demonstrate.

Continuing with the weekly update:

Reference #1 Page 38 Paragraph 1

Chapter: The Grace Period
Section: Water

The paragraph that begins: “However, glass and...”, cautions to be aware that some materials block ultraviolet sunlight to kill microorganisms,

I've decided to pause movement through “The Knowledge” at this point, to spend some time considering the problem of securing potable water which meets the biochemical needs of human beings, animals and plants. These entities have evolved over millennia to depend upon the solutions produced by seeping rain water through soil and rock formations, or passing rain water or snow melt through rivers and streams lined with rocks from which the moving water removes

Most drinking water prepared in 2018 (as nearly as I can tell) takes surface water as input, although a few municipal water supplies draw ground water where it is available. Water treatment follows the general pattern laid out by Dr. Dartnell, which is directed toward removing harmful substances when that can be done, and rendering harmless those which cannot be removed. As an update to this paragraph, I would note that economics is a significant factor in large scale water processing for municipal use. My assumption is that ALL unwanted substances can be removed from water, but the cost of doing that is a factor in the management decision to kill microorganisms rather than to remove them. Hopefully ongoing work to develop more economical filtering methods will yield solutions which are both affordable and practical, so that water free of microorganisms can be delivered in municipal quantities without the addition of chlorine, for example. A particularly interesting line of inquiry is possible use of graphene to separate water molecules from a mixture. Apparently water molecules can pass through the chemically bonded Carbon atoms in a graphene sheet, while sodium chloride molecules are excluded. I would presume that any collections of molecules larger than sodium chloride would be excluded as well, so that water on the output side of a graphene membrane would be safe to drink.

From a practical point of view, I am wondering if a graphene sheet that has been used to filter water in this way would clog up with debris over time, and if that is the case, how it would be cleaned for future use.

That said, my current interest is in discovering how pure water can be enhanced to meet the needs of humans and other creatures which have evolved to depend upon the mixtures delivered by natural springs, in particular. As Hydrogen increasingly becomes an energy carrier of choice for advanced societies, pure water will become available in proportion to its use.

Happily, there are a number of resources available to study for guidance in preparing health giving and sustaining potable water.

This posting is for July 7th.

In the past week, I looked at the possibility of using light spectroscopy to determine of water is safe to drink. Google reveals a significant number of citations relating to this topic. Notes on resources found on or relating to this topic are appended below.

In the course of that investigation, I remembered that Forum Member DaveZ provides a link to blog sites where he has posted information on topics generally relating to his travels on land and sea. In one of those posts, DaveZ describes a misadventure with stream water that turned out to be contaminated with microorganisms. This anecdote supports Dr. Dartnell's advice in the current chapter to use a means of preparing surface water for use.

In Reference #3, below, Mr. Bessen begins Part II, with a focus on Wages.

In pages 89-95, Mr. Bessen discusses “Wages and Alternative Employment”

Begin Quotation on page 90:
The market for experienced weavers was limited in the 1830s because the pool of experienced workers living around Lowell was small and because neither operations nor training were standardized.
End Quotation.

Begin Quotation on page 95:
The deepening returns to experience, … demonstrate that weavers did, indeed, make bigger investments and earn bigger returns.
End Quotation

Next week Mr. Bessen takes up: “Technology and Jobs”

(th)

Appendix: Searches using Google for the use of spectroscopy to evaluate drinking water

2018/07/14 Notes for Knowledge forum update

© Royal Society of Chemistry 2018. Registered charity number 207890.

Begin Quotation:
Online Monitoring of Drinking Water with Optical Spectroscopy
C. Jaehn, M. Wagner, W. Schmidt and C. Moldaenke
The absence of contamination in drinking water is essential to protect public health. Online monitoring is a promising strategy to ensure a good drinking water quality. Online analysis techniques mainly cover physico‐chemical parameters e.g. pH‐value and turbidity. In comparison, the online detection of single contaminants is quite difficult and costly. A promising alternative is the rapid detection of abnormalities or changes in the water matrix by spectroscopic techniques such as absorbance or fluorescence (emission) spectroscopy.

End Quotation.


http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/ebook/978-1-84973-441-7


Water Contamination Emergencies: Managing the Threats

https://books.google.com/books?id=2HIoD ... &q&f=false

https://www.photonics.com/a25126/Spectr ... Techniques

https://www.photonics.com/a26915/FTIR_s ... _pathogens

begin Quotation:

The group plans to establish a spectral library of major food and waterborne pathogens and to evaluate other statistical analysis methods such as artificial neural networks for data analysis. The researchers are getting closer to commercialization of a test method for drinking water, but there is still a lot of work that needs to be done, Lin said.

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Aug. 9, 2006, pp. 5749-5754.

End Quotation.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 5417306735

Assessment of drinking water quality at the tap using fluorescence spectroscopy

This document is available as a downloadable pdf.

Begin Quotation:
Abstract
Treated drinking water may become contaminated while travelling in the distribution system on the way to consumers. Elevated dissolved organic matter (DOM) at the tap relative to the water leaving the treatment plant is a potential indicator of contamination, and can be measured sensitively, inexpensively and potentially on-line via fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy. Detecting elevated DOM requires potential contamination events to be distinguished from natural fluctuations in the system, but how much natural variation to expect in a stable distribution system is unknown. In this study, relationships between DOM optical properties, microbial indicator organisms and trace elements were investigated for households connected to a biologically-stable drinking water distribution system. Across the network, humic-like fluorescence intensities showed limited variation (RSD = 3.5–4.4%), with half of measured variation explained by interactions with copper. After accounting for quenching by copper, fluorescence provided a very stable background signal (RSD < 2.2%) against which a ∼2% infiltration of soil water would be detectable. Smaller infiltrations would be detectable in the case of contamination by sewage with a strong tryptophan-like fluorescence signal. These findings indicate that DOM fluorescence is a sensitive indicator of water quality changes in drinking water networks, as long as potential interferents are taken into account.

End Quotation.
May every member of The Knowledge forum grow financially, intellectually, socially and beyond.
tahanson43206
 
Posts: 492
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: 20160208 Vision Author Culture on Knowledge Forum

Postby tahanson43206 » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:35 pm

20180714 Update Knowledge Forum Knowledge Thread

As a note of possible interest to any readers who might be thinking of applying for membership in this forum:
It has been established that the Signature Line of your pending membership can be used for communication.
I do not have a way (at present) to see who has logged in recently, but I can check the status of the newest member.
If you have applied for membership in the forum, and no one else has applied after you, then you will be listed as the newest member.
It is easy for me to check the newest member status, because the newest member is listed at the bottom of the main page.
It has been established that while an applicant is waiting for approval by the administrator, I can send Private Mail to the applicant.
It has been established that an applicant who receives Private Mail can reply via the Signature Line of the membership.
This is a curious way to communicate, I admit, but I am interested in hearing from applicants.
I would like to hear from anyone who would like to try the culture of self-directed knowledge accumulation I have tried to demonstrate.

Continuing with the weekly update:

Reference #1 Page 38 Paragraph 1

Chapter: The Grace Period
Section: Water

The paragraph that begins: “However, glass and...”, cautions to be aware that some materials block ultraviolet sunlight to kill microorganisms,

I've decided to pause movement through “The Knowledge” at this point, to spend some time considering the problem of securing potable water which meets the biochemical needs of human beings, animals and plants. These entities have evolved over millennia to depend upon the solutions produced by seeping rain water through soil and rock formations, or passing rain water or snow melt through rivers and streams lined with rocks from which the moving water removes

The direction I'd like to look is toward nanotechnology and (in this case) toward invention and development of molecular machines small enough to identify and secure molecules that are NOT water. Nature provides examples of the kind of machine this would be. Molecular machines have evolved to be able to make their way into cells and to make a living there. A “dynamic water filter” system would enlist the services of molecular machines able to identify molecules which are NOT water, to secure them in some way, and to transport them to some desired destination.

Energy would be required to accomplish this, and photons would seem worth considering as a mechanism for energy delivery to molecular machines.

While Dr. Dartnell's focus on Page 38 is securing of drinkable water for an individual or a small group, I am thinking about the ongoing and persistent problem of polluted fresh water flowing along rivers into lakes. The example of the State of Ohio's inability to effectively address the problem of inefficient application of nutrients to agricultural land shows that a solution is needed that does not require anyone to do anything that might cost them money or time. The problem is the perennial one of the Commons. In this case, I am thinking of the fresh water lakes in Ohio, including Lake Erie. No one who is delivering nutrients to the lakes via run off from their fields wants to be asked to make the investments of time or money that would be needed to prevent nutrients from entering the Lake.

The community as a whole might be willing to make an investment to prevent nutrients from entering the various lakes, but there is (at present) no mechanism capable of clearing water flowing through the various rivers that feed Lake Erie, so the problem continues unabated.

For the problem of Dr. Dartnell's individual or small group, I am imagining a container of water to be cleaned, and one which contains a collection of water clearing nanomachines. The water to be cleaned would be poured into the machine filled container, at a rate appropriate to the capabilities of the collection. The output from the activity of the machines would be pure water molecules, and molecules of various kinds identified and sorted by the nanomachines, and delivered to suitable output collection points.

For a river in today's world, the situation would be quite different. As is done with today's municipal water supplies, gates of decreasing cross section would collect debris carried along in the river for processing as appropriate. However, past that point, a stretch of water would be given over to a population of nanomachines to look for and to secure molecules which are NOT water.

This posting is for July 14th.

In the week starting on the 14th, the local newspaper included articles on the subject of wages:

On July 16th, the Opinion page ran a two column editorial discussing a practice of seven fast-food chains, to prevent employees from securing more pay by moving between franchise locations. A legal action in the State of Washington led to the decision of seven companies to remove “no-poach” clauses from their franchise agreements. The editorial concludes:

Begin Quotation:
A healthy consumer economy depends on everyone being able to participate and having incentive to succeed. It can't be based on paying workers at the bottom as little as possible and keeping them their permanently.
End Quotation.

I note that the editorial does not appear to object to paying workers as little as possible. Apparently it is only the “permanent” aspect of the sanctioned practices that the editorial board found distasteful.

On July 18th, on page B11 of the Columbus Dispatch, Jeff Stein of The Washington Post reported:
“Fed chief concerned wages aren't growing”

Since Mr. Bessen is writing about periods when wages remained flat for extended periods in American history, I can't help wondering if factors Mr. Bessen described are at work today.

Begin Quotation of Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome Powell:
“We want an economy that works for everyone,” (…) “In the last five years or so, labor share of profits has been sideways. This is very much akin to the flattening out of medium incomes the last few decades.”
End Quotation.

In Reference #3, below, Mr. Bessen begins Part II, with a focus on Wages.

In pages 95-98, Mr. Bessen discusses “Technology and Jobs”

Begin Quotation on page 98:
The key point is that in a competitive economy, the effect of technology on jobs depends on demand.
End Quotation.

Begin later Quotation on Page 98:
What also matters is much technology increases demand, by reducing prices, improving quality, or adding new product features.
End Quotation.

On July 21st, CSPAN broadcast an interview with the author of a book on the future of work ….

Title: The End of Work
Author: John Tamny

Mr. Tamny appears to be remarkably optimistic about the impact which robots will have on the economy of the United States, and (I presume) of the world at large.

When the interviewer expressed concern that a robot might take his job, Mr. Tamny said that the interviewer should hope that would happen, because the interviewer would then be freed to pursue activity which is important or meaningful to him. I took this with a grain of salt, since (in my estimation) the interviewer was probably ALREADY acting at the peak level of his interest and capabilities, but for many workers in the economy of 2018, that is certainly not the case.

Mr. Tamny reminded the audience that only 150 years or so ago, most people devoted their lives to the growing of food for themselves and their neighbors. In the years since, primitive robots have taken on the vast majority of the tasks involved in raising food for the population, and the millions of people freed of agricultural labor have gone on to specialize in ways which contributed to the productivity of the nation as a whole.

Next week Mr. Bessen takes up: “Technology and Globalization”

(th)
May every member of The Knowledge forum grow financially, intellectually, socially and beyond.
tahanson43206
 
Posts: 492
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:38 pm

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